Dzanc Books Reading

October 17, 2009
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Join us for a Dzanc Books release party and reading featuring fiction writers Laura van den Berg and Robert Lopez. Come early for cupcakes and free drinks. Mobile Libris will be there selling books.

Laura van den Berg was raised in Florida and earned her MFA at Emerson College. She is the recipient of scholarships from the Bread Loaf and Sewanee Writers’ Conferences, the 2009 Julia Peterkin Award, and the 2009-2010 Emerging Writer Lectureship at Gettysburg College. Her fiction has appeared in One Story, Boston Review, American Short Fiction, Best American Nonrequired Reading 2008, Best New American Voices 2010, and The Pushcart Prize XXIV: Best of the Small Presses, among others. Laura’s first collection of stories, What the World Will Look Like When All the Water Leaves Us (Dzanc Books, 2009), is the winner of the Dzanc Prize and was recently selected by Barnes & Noble for their Discover Great New Writers Program.  http://www.lauravandenberg.com/

“In her first collection Laura van den Berg creates a series of remarkable characters each of whom is striking out for territory unknown, plunging into an uncharted sea. I love the exhilarating sense of adventure in these stories, how they make the world seem larger, and how van den Berg maps our familiar pains in strikingly new ways. What The World Will Look Like When All The Water Leaves Us is a dazzling and original debut.” —Margot Livesey

Robert Lopez is the author of two novels, Part of the World and Kamby Bolongo Mean River, just out from Dzanc Books. His fiction has appeared in dozens of publications and he teaches at The New School, Pratt Institute, and Columbia University. http://www.dzancbooks.org/store/lopez-kamby.html

“Reading Part of the World by Robert Lopez felt to me like standing in front of one of those marvelous, mind-bending exhibits at the Museum of Jurassic Technology that seem at first glance to be doing exactly nothing and at second glance to be dissolving and reconstituting reality as we thought we knew it. Literary pleasures like this are all too uncommon.” —Laird Hunt